A Blizzard’s Coming, and Not the Delicious Kind

December 26th, 2010 by

I just found out that in the next couple of days, a blizzard is going to hit the Northeast. And it’s a big deal, because based on the use of all caps in the weather advisory announcement, the forecasters are trying to yell really, really loud.

Growing up in sunny Southern California, I never had to worry about blizzards or snowstorms. Hail fell from the sky about once every 30 years. Rain was rare and timid. So to me, snow was exciting, and the idea of having to “survive the winter” was thrilling. Now that I’m in (freezing) New York City, I no longer have to live vicariously through the snowstorms described in books!

Things I Learned from Books about Winter:

  • If you’re in a blizzard, keep walking to stay warm, but make sure you hold onto a rope, or a building. You don’t want to wander off! (The Long Winter)
  • If you feel a solid snowdrift that you can hide in, make a large air pocket and hide in there. Eating the Christmas candy in your pocket is optional. (By the Banks of Plum Creek)
  • If you have a snow dog, make sure to take care of it well. In return, it’ll take care of you. (The Call of the Wild)
  • “Whatever else you do, keep your feet warm!” (Superintendent Williams to Laura’s class, when visiting in These Happy Golden Years)
  • It’s good to have a tiny piece of bread saved up in a mitten. It could save your life! (Patty Reed’s Doll: The Story of the Donner Party)

Okay. I know these aren’t really survival skills. But they’re fun tidbits that have stuck with me from those books over the years. Are there any “survival skills” that stuck with you from your favorite winter-themed books?

— Nancy

Nancy knows that in reality, she has the survival skills of a peanut. She’ll be staying in the next few days.

Meet Nancy »

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