Meet Yesterday’s Celebs: Books About Real-Life Figures

January 12th, 2010 by

If you’re a loyal fan of Kidsmomo (and all the cool kids are, of course), then you know that a little while back, a class in Indiana submitted a bunch of awesome book reviews — many of them for biographies.

Nancy was inspired to revisit some of her favorite books about Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan, and we’ve decided to dedicate our new theme entirely to books about famous real-life figures!

So get ready to meet yesterday’s celebrities through this week’s recommended reads (in no particular order):

Nonfiction Biographies:

  1. Leonardo Da Vinci: The Genius Who Defined the Renaissance by John Phillips (Nancy’s pick)
  2. Lincoln: A Photobiography by Russell Freedman
  3. Bully for You, Teddy Roosevelt! by Jean Fritz
  4. Charles A. Lindbergh: A Human Hero by James Cross Giblin
  5. We Were There, Too! Young People in U.S. History by Phillip M. Hoose
  6. Sojourner Truth: Ain’t I A Woman by Patricia C. McKissack and Frederick McKissack

Fiction:

  1. A Spotlight for Harry by Eric A. Kimmel (Karen’s pick) &#151 Harry Houdini
  2. Baseball Card Adventures by Dan Gutman &#151 famous ballplayers including Jackie Robinson and Babe Ruth
  3. Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes
  4. Riding Freedom by Pam Muñoz Ryan &#151 Charlotte Parkhurst
  5. Streams to the River, River to the Sea by Scott O’Dell &#151 Sacagawea
  6. Royal Diaries series by various authors &#151 female monarchs including Cleopatra and Marie Antoinette

If you’ve read any of these, send in your book review and we may read it our podcast. Or send in a review of your favorite book about a real-life famous figure!

One Response

  • Nancy writes:
    March 25th, 2015 at 8:47 am

    My fav person is Helen Keller. I always love reading about her and what she did when she was little.

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