The First Rule of Punk by Celia C. Pérez: Book Review

August 5th, 2019 by

first-rule-of-punkWhat’s the first rule of punk? According to The First Rule of Punk by Celia C. Pérez, it’s “There are no rules.”

But as the protagonist’s dad points out, that’s not useful advice for a kid being forced to move to a new city where she’ll be separated from her father and she won’t know anyone. So what’s the second rule of punk? “Be yourself.”

Easier said than done, Malú (short for María Luisa) discovers when her mom drags her to their new home in Chicago. Immediately, she makes an enemy of a popular girl at school. She gets in trouble for violating the dress code. And she can’t seem to get along with her mom, who is constantly bugging her to connect with their Mexican heritage and act like a proper señorita. For Malú, it’s not a good start.

So what’s a punk rocker to do in that situation? Start a punk band, of course! Soon, Malú starts thinking maybe she’s found her crowd and her passion — but not everyone’s happy about Malú’s project. What’s a punk rocker to do when challenged and told to shut things down? Well, you’ll have to read the book to find out, of course!

I totally enjoyed The First Rule of Punk from start to finish — and in fact, I was sad when it ended. I wanted to keep hanging out with Malú and her friends and family! I really identified with Malú, who wants to be seen as unique and different and bold. And I understood her desire to oppose what she sees as the restrictive expectations placed on proper, traditional girls from her mother’s culture. I loved following Malú’s journey as she faces these tensions head-on, comes to understand her mom and her heritage better, and grows into herself in pursuit of that second rule of punk.

Plus, the book includes Malú’s zines — the DIY booklets that she makes to express her feelings. I never made any zines myself, but I used to order some through the mail when I was in school, and I always loved flipping through these celebrations of new perspectives. It was awesome for me to see Malú using this empowering medium to share her point of view, putting it out there proudly with a fierce and brave energy. Check out a couple of Malú’s zine pages from the publisher’s website:

zine-pages

I’d recommend this book to anyone who likes stories about being the new kid (like the graphic novel All’s Faire in Middle School and Let’s Pretend We Never Met) or stories about exploring your family’s heritage and culture — even if you have mixed feelings about it at first (like Front Desk and Stef Soto, Taco Queen).

Have you ever wanted to stand out and make an impression on your classmates, like Malú does in the book? Leave a comment below with your story! (Just don’t share any names, including yours!)

— Karen

In high school, Karen always wanted to be seen as weird and “alternative.” This included wearing her dad’s old jeans, even though her dad was much taller and heavier than she was. At one point, she wore a pair of his pants that would fall down around her ankles if she ran — even when she wore a belt!

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