The Boundless by Kenneth Oppel

May 15th, 2017 by

the-boundlessSubmitted by Arissa, Age 9 from Connecticut

Rating: ★★★★★

The Boundless is about a boy named Will Everett that lives in a town that doesn’t have a name yet any way there is this mystery that happend and Will does everything that he can to solve it but one thing that I don’t like the part in the story when he hasn’t seen his father in a long time but everything elese I love It. So below please coment on this review thanks – Arissa

The Nest by Kenneth Oppel: Book Review

December 22nd, 2015 by

The Nest_Kenneth OppelI’m not a fan of bugs, but I’ll make an exception for a good read, and one such exception is The Nest by Kenneth Oppel.

Summer vacation is supposed to be fun and carefree, but no matter what, Steve will worry. He’s anxious about everything: his parents, his little sister, and especially about his newborn baby brother, who is always at the hospital because he was born with a congenital condition.

In his dreams, what appears to be an angel speaks to Steve and offers to “fix” the baby — but she needs Steve’s help. Over time, Steve discovers that the angel is actually a very unique wasp queen, who promises that he can have a perfectly healthy baby brother. But at what price?

As the book moves along, we get to know Steve and his family more: His parents are preoccupied with the baby, and his sister is still too young to understand how sick the baby is. It seems like it’s all up to Steve to figure out if he should help the wasp queen and her hive “fix” the baby.

This is the best kind of scary story: As you’re reading, you’ll feel very tense and relate to how anxious Steve is, but you can’t help but turn the pages to find out what happens! The super spooky black and white illustrations by Jon Klassen also contribute to the tense atmosphere of the book.

Side note: Jon Klassen normally draws uber-adorable drawings like this…

JonKlassen_hatrabbit_main

In The Nest, his illustrations are like this…

The Nest Interior Jon Klassen

One teensy complaint I have about the book is that there’s a mysterious character named Mr. Nobody, and I would have liked to find out more about his story and how he came into Steve’s story. But overall, I would recommend this book to all Kidsmomo readers who like a thrill and a thoughtful read, especially fans of Coraline by Neil Gaiman, The Thing About Jellyfish by Ali Benjamin, or Circus Mirandus by Cassie Beasley.

The Nest not just a scary story, though. By the end, it reminded me that people can be tricked for the right reasons and you can always make up for your mistakes. It’s okay not to be perfect.

Like I said before: Even though bugs are my #1 phobia, I really enjoyed The Nest. I do not, however, recommend reading this right before bedtime (my mistake).

— Nancy

icon_nancyNancy had nightmares about wasps and maggots after finishing this book, but still recommended it to many people the day after. Use that information wisely.

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The Boundless by Kenneth Oppel

December 21st, 2015 by

the-boundless
Submitted by Victoria, Age 10 from Connecticut

Rating: ★★★★★

This book is a great book if you like fantasy, villains, and a book that you will enjoy! Also in this book William Everett is not close to normal, witnessing a murder, and being chased by the person, for a strange reason, read this book and find out why! This book is fantasy.

The Boundless: Book Review

March 22nd, 2015 by

the-boundlessLongtime fans of Kidsmomo are well aware that I’m a super scaredy cat. If I watch a horror movie, I get nightmares. If I so much as accidentally glance at a frightening moment on TV while I’m flipping through the channels, it means I’ll get super freaked out when I go to bed at night. And if I’m in the middle of a creepy book, then I’d be wise not to read it after dark!

Turns out The Boundless is one of those books.

I guess I should have known because it’s written by Kenneth Oppel, the author of the Apprenticeship of Victor Frankenstein series (for ages 12 and up). I’ve deliberately stayed away from his Frankenstein books, but for some reason, I thought The Boundless would be more of a light-hearted mystery. Fail.

Except it wasn’t really a fail at all because I really enjoyed the book!

It’s a steampunk adventure set on a train as it makes its transcontinental journey across the wilds of Canada. But the train is no ordinary locomotive; it’s incredibly long — like a moving city — and this is its maiden voyage.

Will’s father is the manager, so they have first-class tickets. But Will lingers outside too long during a stop, and he witnesses a murder, then must seek refuge at the back of the train where he has no ticket to identify him. But soon it becomes clear that it would be better NOT to be recognized because the killer is looking for him — and he’s got a whole team of brakemen along the length of the train working on a heist. AND they’re not afraid to kill Will to keep him quiet.

You may be thinking that’s not very frightening. Fine, you have a higher threshold for tense situations than I do. But what would you say about Sasquatches and a supernatural hag lady who controls your mind? Because I, for one, find them creepy and they also play a part in the book.

Also, there are circus people. But surprisingly, although some of them are a bit freaky, none of them are scary. In fact, they help Will as he tries to reach his father.

If you’re interested in a dark, action-packed, thrilling tale, then you should definitely check out The Boundless. Somehow it manages to be both quiet and gripping at the same time, and despite all the scary bits, there are also moments of humor and brightness and happiness and hope.

If you’ve already read the book, leave a comment and tell me your thoughts! Did you have to avoid reading it at night like I did?

— Karen

Karen has never taken an overnight train trip, but she thinks it probably wouldn’t be that comfortable. However, if she could ride on the Polar Express, she would jump at the chance!

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