Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca Stead

January 11th, 2016 by

Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca SteadSubmitted by Kelsey, Age 11 from New York

Rating: ★★★★★

Goodbye Stranger is a book about 3 girls: Bridget(Bridge), Tabitha, and Emily. There are also many chapters called “Valentines Day” in which there is another girl who remains anonymous until the end. Bridge had gotten in a car accident when she was 8 years old and one of the nurses told her that she must be on the Earth for a reason because Bridge barely survived. When Bridge came back to school after the accident Tabitha had made a new friend named Emily. Bridge, Emily, and Tabitha made up one rule: No Fighting. This book takes place in Bridge, Emily, Tabitha’s 7th grade year and is a great book about friendship. I would recommend this to anyone who wants a good read.

Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca Stead

January 9th, 2016 by

Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca SteadSubmitted by Jane, Age 11 from New York

Rating: ★★★★½

Emily, Tabitha, and Bridge are three seventh grade girls who go through the year with a promise of ” no fighting”. At first everything goes smoothly and there are no corruptions in the friendship, but as the year goes on the promise becomes harder and harder to keep. Going through drama is NOT what these girls need. Goodbye Stranger is up for the Mock Newbery Award, written by a Newbery winning author. I thought that this was a excellent book, and I would recommend it to anyone who’s more on the mature side.

Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca Stead

January 8th, 2016 by

Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca SteadSubmitted by Alexis, Age 12 from New York

Rating: ★★★★★

“Goodbye Stranger” is a book a bout 3 friends and as they grow up. They are around 12-13, and in 7th grade. They swore to never fight as children, and as they start 7th grade it gets kind of hard. Their names are Bridet (she prefers Bride), Tabitha, and Emily. As all of this goes on, an unnamed high schooler shares her experience on Valentine’s Day.
This book is fantastic!

When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead

December 19th, 2014 by

when_you_reach_meSubmitted by Joseph, Age 11 from New York

Rating: ★★★★★

This book has to be definitely on my top 10 books I have read. The book I have read was When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead. This book is about a girl named Miranda and she finds these 3 different notes that all ties up at the ending of who wrote these notes.

First Light by Rebecca Stead

September 19th, 2010 by

first-light-rebecca-stead-book-reviewSubmitted by Jenna, Age 12 from Maine

Rating: ★★★★★

Peter and Thea are total oppisites. For one thing, Peter lives in New York City with his father, who is studying Global Warming, and his mother, whom he thinks to be from England and a normal mother. Thea lives under the the ice in Greenland, with her people, casually ice skating from place to place, learning and reciting her people’s history, but also longing to find her way to the top of the ice and see the sun for the first time in her life, as her mother once risked her life to do.

Then Peter goes to Greenland with his parents and a graduate student of his father’s, Peter is noticing things that he is unsure what to think of. When he is looking for the answers, each step and epiphany draws him nearer and nearer to Thea.

By the author of “When you Reach Me,” allow yourself to be drawn into a world where you will live under the ice and secrets will be revealed.

Breaking Book News: And the Award Goes To…

January 20th, 2010 by

Yes, the Golden Globes were on Sunday, but who cares about the glitz and glamor of Hollywood? I’m talking about the American Library Association’s annual awards that went out on Monday — including the Newbery Medal.

The Newbery Medal is like the holy grail for children’s book writers. Or if you’re not an Indiana Jones fan, then think of it like the MVP award for the best kids’ book author of the year. Or if you’re not into sports, you can consider it like the Blue Ribbon for, well, for anything that’s super competitive. In other words, the Newbery Medal is a really, really cool thing to get.

When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead

When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead

And this year, the Newbery went to… [drumroll, please]… When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead! If you missed my previous blog post about the book, then you missed out on an excellent piece of writing. Whoops, I should probably be celebrating Rebecca Stead, not congratulating myself. So here’s a little rundown of When You Reach Me:

Imagine you’re just going about your life — going to school, hanging out with your best friend, spending time with your mom and her boyfriend — and then all of a sudden you get a message from the future. WHA?! Personally, I’d freak out and hide under my bed covers for a while. But not Miranda, the protagonist in When You Reach Me. And that’s good, because it makes for a much more interesting book!

So if you want to see who won the kidlit world’s version of the Heisman Trophy, check out When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead.

And then try out this year’s Newbery Honor books (aka, the runners-up):

Oh, man, I’m never going to make a dent in my To Be Read list, am I?!

— Karen

Sincerely, Guess Who…

October 4th, 2009 by

When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead

When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead

Last night as I was walking home, I noticed a slip of paper lying on the ground under a tree. At first I thought it was a postcard, but when I saw another identical paper a few feet away, I looked closer and realized it was a bunch of promotional fliers for a restaurant.

Too bad. For a split second, I had entertained the notion that it was a series of postcards, deliberately left in a trail along the sidewalk for a specific person to find. Wouldn’t that have been much more exciting than the plain old litter it turned out to be?

I guess I’m just under the influence of When You Reach Me, a new novel by Rebecca Stead that I read last week. In the book, sixth-grader Miranda starts receiving mysterious messages from a stranger who seems to know the future — and I stayed up WAY past my bedtime to finish the whole thing and discover the end of the story.

Spiderweb for Two by Elizabeth Enright (Don't be turned off by this baby-ish cover; this book is AWESOME!)

Spiderweb for Two by Elizabeth Enright (Don't be turned off by this baby-ish cover; this book is AWESOME!)

Funnily enough, I also just bought myself a copy of another book involving anonymous messages — Spiderweb for Two: A Melendy Maze, a childhood favorite of mine by Elizabeth Enright. It’s the last book in a series about the Melendy family, but I read it first and it’s still the installment that I love the best. In it, Randy and Oliver are feeling lonely after their older siblings all leave home for school. But things change in an instant when they receive a surprise message from an anonymous source, leading them on a treasure hunt via more mysterious notes and clues.

So, who’s behind all these strange notes? In the case of When You Reach Me, I figured out the sender partway through the book — but I was stumped as to why, up until the dramatic ending. With Spiderweb for Two, I couldn’t even begin to guess who the messages were from — but I loved following along with Randy and Oliver as they pieced together each new puzzle.

Now I’m wondering: is it just a coincidence that I got my hands on these two books in the same week? Could it be a sign? Maybe I myself will soon receive notes from a stranger…

Or, hey, if you guys leave me some comments on this post, then I guess those would count! Not quite as mysterious and thrilling as what I had in mind, but I’ll take it! Especially if guys have any recommendations for other children’s books about characters who get messages from mysterious sources. The only other one I can think of is The Long Secret by Louise Fitzhugh — a kind of sequel to Harriet the Spy in which someone starts leaving disturbing notes for various town residents. But that’s not quite the same idea. Although, if I stumble across of copy of The Long Secret in the next few days, then I’ll know something is really up with the universe and I have an adventure in store!

— Karen