Titanic Voices of the Disaster by Deborah Hopkinson

January 4th, 2013 by

Submitted by Kyle, Age 11 from New York

Rating: ★★★★★

This is a great book it is about the peoples prospective and they go all the way to to when to when the carpatheia comes!

Titanic: Voices from the Disaster – Book Review

April 14th, 2012 by

titanic-voices-from-the-disasterTomorrow, April 15th, 2012, marks the 100-year anniversary of the sinking of the great ship Titanic. Almost everyone has heard of the Titanic — but if you’re a history buff like me, you’ll want to pick up Deborah Hopkinson’s new book, Titanic: Voices from the Disaster.

The book is, of course, nonfiction — but as I was reading it, I found myself sucked into 1912. I kept hoping it was a tragic made-up story — only to remember that this actually happened. Warning: this book will probably make you cry. So many people perished, but many people were really brave, too — like the husbands who insisted their wives and children get into the limited lifeboats, knowing that they themselves would drown in the icy waters.

It’s not all sad, though — at the beginning of the book, I found out a lot about the luxurious cabins and accommodations, along with how a 882.5-foot hunk of steel travels so quickly in the water. Did you know that most photos of the Titanic are actually photos of its sister ship, the Olympic? Or that there was a swimming pool and gymnasium on the ship, which is pretty normal on cruise ships these days, but was quite an advancement in 1912? I especially liked the photo of a man riding a “camel machine.”

Confession: I’m kind of scared of boats and sea travel (and this book did not help!), so I don’t actually know much about ships. Well, the glossary at the end came to my rescue — I learned just exactly what a collapsible, a davit, and a bulkhead are.

At the end of the book was a nice section on actual people mentioned in the book, and what happened to them after they were rescued by the Carpathia. For the uber-nerds out there, *cough* like me *cough* the charts and statistics about the Titanic were pretty interesting too.

So, like mentioned earlier — if you’re a history buff, pick up this book and sail away to 1912… But if you cry at the drop of a hat, this book might not be for you!

— Nancy

Nancy just realized she’s lived on islands for about 1/3 of her life. Thank goodness for bridges and air travel.